CDC updates guidance on ending home isolation for COVID-19

CDC offered guidance on ending home isolation for several circumstances, depending on factors like the appearance of symptoms.

Posted May 28, 2020

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently published a guidance titled “When You Can be Around Others After You Had or Likely Had COVID-19.”

If you have (or think you might have) COVID-19, stay home and away from other people. Anyone who has close contact with someone with COVID-19 should stay home for 14 days after exposure. When you can be around others (end home isolation) depends on the situation. The CDC’s recommendations differ based on circumstances.

Had or likely had COVID-19 with symptoms

If you think or know that you had COVID-19, and you had symptoms, you can be around others after:

  • 3 days with no fever, and
  • Symptoms improved, and
  • 10 days since symptoms first appeared.

Depending on your healthcare provider’s advice and availability of testing, you might get tested. If so, you can be around others when you have no fever, symptoms have improved, and you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.

Tested positive but no symptoms

If you tested positive for COVID-19 but continue to have no symptoms, you can be around others after 10 days have passed since the test. If you will be tested, you can be around others after two negative test results, at least 24 hours apart.

If you develop symptoms after testing positive, follow the guidance above for “Had or likely had COVID-19 with symptoms.”

Weakened immune system

If you have a weakened immune system due to a health condition or medication, you might need to stay home longer than 10 days after possible exposure. Talk to your healthcare provider, who may recommend testing. You can be around others after two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart. If testing is not available, your doctor should work with an infectious disease expert at your local health department to determine if you are likely to spread COVID-19 to others and need to stay home longer.

This article was written by Ed Zalewski of J. J. Keller & Associates, Inc.

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