North Carolina trucking company shut down by FMCSA

Considered to be a public safety hazard

Posted March 31, 2016

On March 25, 2016, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) ordered a North Carolina-based trucking company to immediately cease all intrastate and interstate operations after a federal investigation found the carrier to pose an imminent hazard to public safety.

In February 2016, the company underwent a federal compliance review investigation and was found to be in violation of multiple federal safety regulations including:

  • Failing to conduct pre-employment background checks on drivers;
  • Failing to ensure drivers were qualified before dispatching them in commercial operations;
  • Failing to properly monitor drivers to ensure compliance with hours-of-service requirements;
  • Failing to conduct random drug and alcohol tests on drivers, and;
  • Failing to ensure that its vehicles were regularly inspected, maintained and repaired and met minimum safety standards.

Violating an imminent hazard out-of-service order may result in a penalty of up to $25,000, operating without necessary authority may result in a fine of not less than $10,000, and operating without a USDOT number may result in a civil penalty of up to $16,000. A violation of this order may also result in a criminal penalty, including a fine of up to $25,000 and imprisonment not to exceed one year.


Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations HandbookJ. J. Keller's Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations Handbook includes Parts 303, 325, 350-399, and 40 of the FMCSRs, with interpretations inserted immediately following the regulation.


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